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September 14 , 2011

Web Ready Images

September 14 , 2011 04:27 PM
 

 

As Photographers we want to show our pictures on the web for family, friends or customers to see. However, we don't want people to easily steal them. Do we?
 
As much as we'd like to think that people will be nice, fair and respect other people's pictures... Well, that's not the case. On the contrary, some people might actually belief that pictures on the Internet are FREE

 

So, there are a couple of simple steps we can take to make this a bit harder and help people realize that they're stealing our pictures.

 

One thing to do before uploading pictures to blogs or anywhere on the Internet is to brand them. Some people call it Watermark, others call it signature and others just type their name on the pictures.

 

Pretty much any editing software will allow you to type your name on the images so people know who took the pictures.

 

My preference is a watermark and (depending where I post them) my screenname, account name or business name. This step can be done quickly by creating an Photoshop Action

 

Merry-go-round

 

Next thing to do is resize the pictures.
 
Web ready pictures do not need to be larger than 72DPI. Most people upload pictures in full resolution which is print quality. If someone downloads 72DPI picture to print it...well, lets say the print will not look nice. Smaller pictures will also help your blog load faster and not wait an eternity for the pictures to show on the monitor :)

 

So, before uploading pictures to the Internet take the time to change the size down to 72DPI.

 

In Photoshop, go to the Image menu and scroll down to Image Size. Alternatively, you can use the shortcut ALT+CTRL+I (that's an i). My personal preference is 500x750 (landscape) or 750x500 (portrait) and 72DPI

 

72 DPI

 

We might not be able to prevent people from stealing or using our pictures without permission but at least they will see who the picture belongs to